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Daniel Eatock

June 7th, 2006

Daniel Eatock has tons of projects worth mentioning, but the Felt-Tip Print is definitely one of my favorites!

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Processed Potatoes

September 1st, 2011

Daniel Eatock updated his website with some new work. Processed Potatoes definitely stands out: a full packet of crisps chewed into a pulp, spat out, and formed into the shape of a potato.

Set Square Cubed: 6 plastic 45° set squares, blue tack

Unicycle & Stabilisers

Goldfish Bowl & Basketball: 31cm glass bowl, size 7 NBA rubber basketball

Spray Can Sprayed With Its Own Contents

October 18th, 2010

Spray Can Sprayed With Its Own Contents by Daniel Eatock.

Gray paint (primer) sprayed from an aerosol canister directly into the oncoming air stream of a powerful desktop fan. The paint exited the aerosol and was redirected back towards itself, evenly covering the canister in the paint it previously held.

One Pin Notice

September 14th, 2010

“One Pin Notice” by Daniel Eatock.

Wall Shelves Supported by the Objects they Bear

April 22nd, 2010

“Wall Shelves Supported by the Objects they Bear” by Daniel Eatock.

Quarter Mile Groove

February 22nd, 2010

“Quarter Mile Groove” by Daniel Eatock.

The recording translates the length of its vinyl groove into audio allowing listeners to experience the 1/4 mile length of the spiral as the record is played. Every inch of the needle’s path is audible in the form of a click, each foot as a beat and distances of 10 feet are heard as a blip. These sounds gradually slow as the stylus approaches the center, (the stylus travels less distance in the groove with each revolution of the record). Along the way, the voice of the narrator mentions the horizontal dimensions of particular objects.

Production by Malcolm Goldie.

This tangle is the unbroken, vinyl residue resulting from the initial master cutting of Quarter Mile Groove. Unraveled, this thread of vinyl would be 1⁄4 mile in length.

Display Book Shelf

November 3rd, 2009

Display Book Shelf by Daniel Eatock.

MDF shelf, 6 feet long, 1 foot wide, 3/4 inch thick, resting on two metal brackets displaying books borrowed from Belk Library. The shelf sags under the weight of its contents in a graceful arc, the top edges of all the books are perfectly flush as a result of a conscious selection of volumes chosen to accommodate (or compensate for) the arc of the sagging shelf.

Display Book Shelf by Daniel Eatock

found at dropular

Up & Down

May 22nd, 2009

“Up & Down” by Daniel Eatock.

Up & Down by Daniel Eatock

Prismacolor Pen Print

January 5th, 2009

“Prismacolor Pen Print” by Daniel Eatock. I can definitely recommend his book Imprint: Works 1975-2007.

A complete set of 156 Prismacolor Markers (arranged following manufacturer’s numbered color chart) held within inverted glasses, one ream of 25″ x 38″ uncoated, 40 lb. paper, divided into two stacks.

This work is adapted from Pantone Pen Print a 2006 edition of a total of 73 prints using a full set of Pantone markers.

Over the course of the 39 days of the exhibition (September 18 through October 26, 2008), the paper absorbed the ink from the pens. The sheets at the top of each stack absorbed more ink than the sheets farther away from the tips of the pens. The result is an edition of organically related prints, each unique.

The ink reached the 31st sheet in the stack of paper that comprises the top half of the diptych and the 29th sheet of the stack that comprises the bottom half of the diptych.Prior to discovering the extent of the edition, it was determined that the price of each diptych would equal the highest number of sheets stained by the ink.

Prismacolor Pen Print by Daniel Eatock

Prismacolor Pen Print by Daniel Eatock

Prismacolor Pen Print by Daniel Eatock

Do Not Touch

October 9th, 2008

Do Not Touch by Daniel Eatock.

5 pine planks (each 6 feet), 5 metal brackets, tools and materials from the gallery utility closet or found on the gallery grounds. Each of the five shelves that comprise this work is balanced on a single bracket. All maintain their level balance by the precise placement of the objects they bear.

Do Not Touch by Daniel Eatock

found at pan-dan


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