Descriptive Camera

April 26th, 2012

Matt Richardson created a camera which doesn’t deliver a photo but a description of the photo it made. Eh what? After the shutter button is pressed, the Descriptive Camera sends the photo to Amazons Mechanical Turk for processing. Somewhere someone receives this photo and writes a short description about what’s on the photo, that person receives a small payment for this task. As soon as that text comes back, a thermal printer outputs the result in the style of a polaroid print.
How cool is that!

Alerting Infrastructure!

December 19th, 2011

Alerting Infrastructure! by Jonah Brucker-Cohen is a physical hit counter that translates hits to the web site of an organization into interior damage of the physical building that web site or organization represents. The focus of the piece is to amplify the concern that physical spaces are slowly losing ground to their virtual counterparts. The amount of structural damage to the building directly correlates to the amount of exposure and attention the web site gets, thus exposing the physical structure’s temporal existence.

found at pietmondriaan

Little Printer

November 29th, 2011

BERG, a London-based design studio, has just announced 2 new products: Little Printer and BERG Cloud. Little Printer is a thermal printer with a wireless connection to the Web. Each time you press the button, a neat little personalised package will be printed immediately. You can configure the messages with your smartphone, this is the part where the BERG Cloud will shine. Just watch the video and see how beautiful the graphic design is.
Unfortunately it will only be launched as a “beta” product in 2012. Can’t wait to get one.

Lumenoise

November 8th, 2011

Lumenoise is a light pen, which turns your old CRT-TV into an audiovisual synthesizer, made by Niklas Roy.

You paint abstract geometric patterns and sounds directly onto the screen. It is a playful and performative device, as anything that you do will cause an instantaneous reflection in the gadget’s sonic and visual output.

Just watch the video below, the grey square is the position of the light pen.

Niklas actually gave me an early version of the Lumenoise. The battery and the circuit were not yet inside the pen, but that doesn’t change the fact that it’s  funny to play with. The simplicity of the this technology is really amazing.

Time Print Machine

August 4th, 2011

Time Print Machine by Paul Ferragut is a printing system using felt pen on blotting paper. The felt-pen ink bleed in the paper for a duration relative to the grey value of a pixel. Every “time stain” gradually recreates any images in a pointillist style. The aim of this project is to emphasize the making process, it can take 20 hours to print one color on a A2 paper.

Tele-Present Water

July 8th, 2011

Tele-Present Water by David Bowen.

This installation draws information from the intensity and movement of the water in a remote location. Wave data is being collected in real-time from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data buoy Station 46246 (49°59’7″ N 145°5’20” W) on the Pacific Ocean. The wave intensity and frequency is scaled and transferred to the mechanical grid structure installed at The National Museum in Wroclaw, Poland. The result was a simulation of the physical effects caused by the movement of water from this distant location.

found at creativeapplications.net

Electronic Instant Camera

July 5th, 2011

Niklas Roy is on a roll, Electronic Instant Camera is an other new project by him. It’s a combination of an analog b/w videocamera and a thermal receipt printer.

The device is something in between a Polaroid camera and a digital camera. The camera doesn’t store the pictures on film or digital medium, but prints a photo directly on a roll of cheap receipt paper while it is taking it. As this all happens very slow, people have to stay still for about three minutes until a full portrait photo is taken.

I really like the look of the prints! Could you take my picture Niklas?

PING! Augmented Pixel

July 5th, 2011

“PING! Augmented Pixel” is Niklas Roy‘s latest project.

“PING! – Augmented Pixel” is a seventies style video game, that adds a layer of digital information and old-school aesthetics to a video signal: A classic rectangular video game ball moves across a video image. Whenever the ball hits something dark, it bounces off. The game itself has no rules and no goal.

You could say that it’s just an augmented reality version of Pong. But Niklas just did a little more than just that. PING! – Augmented Pixel doesn’t use a computer to process the video signal and display the game. Niklas made a read hardware box with its own micro-controller. Impressive work!

Polargraph

June 23rd, 2011

I really have a sweet spot for drawing machines. Sandy Noble developed his own version: the Polargraph. He was heavily inspired by Hektor, the spraycan robot, but also by the AS200 drawbot and Harvey Moon’s drawing machine. I really like the style of the drawings, which is probably defined by the dual-polar coordinates the system uses internally.
I guess it’s no surprise that he used an arduino board and processing to build the Polargraph.

found at triangulation blog

DataBot Mouse

June 17th, 2011

DataBot Mouse is very interesting experiment by Jan Barth and Roman Grasy. They’ve developed a computer mouse which can give data physical properties, to make the communication/interaction between man and data more human and easier to understand.

The mouse is able to communicate three different properties of data. It can show you the weight of files and folders, by braking with different force, according to the file-size. Or you can set a custom weight for files, just like the color marking function in MacOSX. So you can find important files more easily.
The third property, the mouse can show you, is the activity of files and folders. By “breathing” with different intervals, it shows how much a file was opened or how busy a folder has been recently.

It was developed with vvvv and arduino.


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