CSS Mural

August 24th, 2010

This CSS Mural by Paul Flannery is actually a little nerdy. He didn’t use any drawing or painting software but just HTML and CSS. The downside is that it looks different in different browsers.

This is the HTML & CSS version.

This is how looks like in Firefox.

And here’s a bonus piece by Paul: Spellbound.

8-bit Color Cycling with HTML5

July 26th, 2010

8-bit Color Cycling with HTML5. Euh what? A few years ago, video cards could only render 256 colors at a time. So it was very hard to do nice animations. That’s why they invented color cycling. Certain pixel areas cylce through a palette of colors to suggest animation. A very simple idea with a really nice aesthetical outcome.
Joseph Huckaby adapted this principle to HTML5 (forget about Internet Explorer) and brought some artwork by Mark Ferrari to life. Check out these examples. And if you’re up for it, here‘s some more information.

found via @mrdoob

387 & 388

July 8th, 2010

387 & 388 are Andrey Yazev his latest HTML & javascript experiments. Both work best with Safari or Google Chrome, especially 388.

387

388

Temporary.cc

November 12th, 2009

Temporary.cc is the latest project of Zach Gage. In short, it’s a website that deletes itself.

For each unique visitor it receives, Temporary.cc deletes part of itself. These deletions change the way browsers understand the website’s code and create a unique (de)generative piece after each new user. Because each unique visit produces a new composition through self-destruction, Temporary.cc can never be truly indexed, as any subsequent act of viewing could irreparably modifiy it.

Eventually, like tangible media, Temporary.cc will fall apart entirely, becoming a blank white website. Its existence will be remembered only by those who saw or heard about it.

Temporary.cc

Another project by Zach worth mentioning is Lose/Lose. It is a video-game with real life consequences. Each alien in the game is created based on a random file on the players computer. If the player kills the alien, the file it is based on is deleted. If the players ship is destroyed, the application itself is deleted.

found at CreativeApplications.Net

Daniel Leyva

October 29th, 2009

You should check out Daniel Leyva his website, especially the part hidden behind the little door. He made some nice little interactive pieces, the best part is that he didn’t use any Flash.

Daniel Leyva

Daniel Leyva

Daniel Leyva

Daniel Leyva

Daniel Leyva

Scrollbars

September 16th, 2009

Scrollbars is javascript experiment by Andrey Yazev. You’ll need the Google Chrome or Safari 4 browser to see this effect.

Scrollbars by Andrey Yazev

adidas Y-3 Autumn/Winter 2009

August 28th, 2009

Autumn is right around the corner and most fashion brands are launching their campaigns. So did adidas Y-3, last season was all about surveillance cameras, this time the campaign is called “Satellite”. The website is once again a very nice execution of this concept, the digital glitches during the transitions are top notch.  When it comes to the apparel, well it’s adidas Y-3, it’s not for everybody but there some nice pieces in the collection.
Made by Sid Lee Amsterdam.

adidas Y-3 Autumn/Winter 2009

adidas Y-3 Autumn/Winter 2009

adidas Y-3 Autumn/Winter 2009

adidas Y-3 Autumn/Winter 2009

adidas Y-3 Autumn/Winter 2009

adidas Y-3 Autumn/Winter 2009

The Playface

August 21st, 2009

Sony redesigned PS3 and asked Wieden+Kennedy Tokyo to develop the campaign for it. They came up with The Playface: “It’s that face you make when you are playing video games and concentrating so much that you don’t even realize the kind of expressions you are making. And everyone has a different one.” They filmed 50 people in the heat of gaming and I must say that the footage cools very good. Just go to the website!
This might actually sound familiar to you. Robbie Cooper did a similar project a while ago called “Immersion“.

The Playface

The Playface

The Playface

The Playface

club.unlike beta

August 14th, 2009

Over a year ago I recommended you this website called berlin.unlike. When I’m asked to describe it, it would be something like this: “the definitive city guide for the mobile generation”. Exactly like they describe themselves.
It’s quite impressive to see how they evolved over the last months. They added 10 other cities to their service like Barcelona, London and Paris. You can now buy iPhone apps for each city or one for all of them; they support offline browsing and a future feature will be offline maps. For those of you who don’t want to spend their time planning their trip, they even sell packages with all kinds of activities, guides and tours.
But today I received the login data for the club.unlike beta. When you’re logged in you can create your own custom tours, import your travel plans from other services, share everything with everything and you’ll get some extras at certain locations. So here is my tour: berlin by today and tomorrow. You can even download it as a PDF. The only critique I have, is the fact that you can’t add a location which is not in the unlike system.
Don’t forget this is a closed beta and there’s still some room for optimizations, but if you’re interested: sign up!

club.unlike

HasCanvas

August 4th, 2009

HasCanvas is one of the Chrome Experiments which promote the new HTML5 standard and of course the Google Chrome webbrowser. HasCanvas is based on Processing.js, a javascript version of Processing, and allows visitors to write and save their own scripts. Most of them remind me of the early Flash days, meaningless little toys. But I’m sure that we will soon see some awesome HTML5 websites.
By the way, you will need a modern browser like Firfox 3.5, Safari 4 or Chrome to see the following experiments.

Click and draw.

both are made by Hiddencorp


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